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Socially active 60-year-olds face lower dementia risk

Posted on August 20, 2019 - Being more socially active in your 50s and 60s predicts a lower risk of developing dementia later on, finds a new UCL-led study. The longitudinal study, published in PLOS Medicine, reports the most robust evidence to date that social contact earlier in life could play an important role in staving off dementia.

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Did Your Health Plan Deny You Care? Fight Back.

Posted on August 15, 2019 - Have you ever stepped up to the pharmacy cash register only to learn your new prescription will cost you hundreds of dollars — instead of your typical $25 copay — because your insurance doesn’t cover it? Or received a painfully high bill for a medical test because your health plan didn’t think it was necessary? Most people have, but only a tiny fraction ever appeal such decisions. In 2017, for example, enrollees in federally run Affordable Care Act marketplace plans appealed fewer than one-half of 1% of denied medical claims, according to an analysis by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

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August Is National Immunization Awareness Month

Posted on August 13, 2019 - Every year, this national observance is held to call attention to the need for vaccinations for people of all ages. Some people think that immunizations are just for children, but this couldn’t be farther from the truth. Vaccines protect us from harmful diseases throughout life—and older adults are often at higher risk of contracting these diseases and suffering serious complications from them. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that seniors who have heart disease, asthma, lung disease and diabetes can be at particularly high risk of these complications, and even of death.

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Hospital Delirium: What Senior Patients and Families Should Know

Posted on August 8, 2019 - A senior goes in for a routine surgery and afterward, family are dismayed to see that their loved one isn’t themselves at all! Their loved one might be agitated, confused, or barely awake. They might not know where they are, or even recognize family members. Their loved one is most likely experiencing delirium, a sudden, temporary change in thinking and function that can happen after a hospital stay, most often for surgery.

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Older adults: Daunted by learning a new task? Learn three.

Posted on August 6, 2019 - Learning several new things at once increases cognitive abilities in older adults, according to new research from UC Riverside. UCR psychologist Rachel Wu says one important way of staving off cognitive decline is learning new skills as a child would. That is, be a sponge: seek new skills to learn; maintain motivation as fuel; rely on encouraging mentors to guide you; thrive in an environment where the bar is set high.

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